Jitendra Madhav Ramchandani

December 19, 2017

7 Favorite Science Books of 2017

I stumbled upon this great list of science books cherry picked by Maria Popova.

1. The River of Consciousness by oliver Sacks

Oliver Sacks, a scientist and a storyteller, is beloved by readers for the extraordinary neurological case histories (Awakenings, An Anthropologist on Mars) in which he introduced and explored many now familiar disorders--autism, Tourette's syndrome, face blindness, savant syndrome. He was also a memoirist who wrote with honesty and humor about the remarkable and strange encounters and experiences that shaped him (Uncle Tungsten, On the Move, Gratitude). Sacks, an Oxford-educated polymath, had a deep familiarity not only with literature and medicine but with botany, animal anatomy, chemistry, the history of science, philosophy, and psychology.

The River of Consciousness is one of two books Sacks was working on up to his death, and it reveals his ability to make unexpected connections, his sheer joy in knowledge, and his unceasing, timeless project to understand what makes us human.

December 18, 2017

88 Best Online Business Courses for Entrepreneurs, Creatives and Professionals (Free & Cheap)

Here is a list of 88 business courses compiled by Ryan Robinson. These courses cover all aspects of starting up, scaling and running a business:
  • Starting a Business & Finding the Right Idea
  • Growing Your Business
  • Blogging & Writing
  • Productivity & Life Hacks
  • Freelancing & Consulting
  • Psychology of Success & People Skills
  • Career Advancement & Landing a Dream Job
  • Podcasting
  • Marketing
  • Building Apps
Here you go...

October 05, 2017

Deepak Chopra on his Quest to Unite Technology, Spirituality & Success

Via FastCompany; Excerpts from Deepak's interview by Drake Baer

Image by Maikel Nai
Wealth is nothing other than abundance consciousness. To understand also that your spiritual nature is to always achieve worthy goals but also to have a relationship with your own creative source within the spirit, and to make sure that your behavior reflects love and compassion. I would say success is a progressive realization of worthy goals, the ability to love and have compassion, and the ability to get in touch with your creative source.

March 28, 2017

Designer vs Developer: how Google is trying to bring them together

By Mustafa Kurtuldu (on CreativeReview)
Image by Gal Shir (https://dribbble.com/galshir)

Google Design Advocate Mustafa Kurtuldu has initiated a YouTube and podcast series aimed at improving understanding between designers and developers

Kurtuldu has been working in digital design since 2001, during which time, he says, he has seen a lot of friction between designers and developers, much of it borne out of a lack of understanding.

As a Design Advocate at Google, he has been party to a lot of internal discussions about how to iron those issues out and thus came up with the idea of Designer vs Developer, a six-part YouTube series and podcast. Released every two weeks, each episode will deal with a different issue, from effective collaboration to whether too much testing and data ruins the creative process.

December 13, 2016

Instinct is your highest form of intelligence

By Maria Popova from Brain Pickings

“Beauty, as a conscious element of experience, as a thing to be valued and explored, has gone into abeyance among us,” Marilynne Robinson wrote in her exquisite reflection on beauty. In our visually voracious culture of accelerating “aesthetic consumerism,” is there still room for beauty not as a trifled commodity but as both an elevating force of transcendence and a grounding force of moral solidity?

That’s what Harvard art historian Sarah Lewis, author of the excellent The Rise: Creativity, the Gift of Failure, and the Search for Mastery (public library) — one of the best psychology books of 2014 — explores in the final segment of her altogether fantastic New York Public Library conversation with artist, playwright, actor, and MacArthur genius Anna Deavere Smith.

Oe of the most piercing parts of the conversation calls to mind Susan Sontag — “The subtraction of beauty as a standard for art hardly signals a decline of the authority of beauty,” Sontag wrote in her characteristically elegant argument against the argument against beauty. “Rather, it testifies to a decline in the belief that there is something called art.” Smith reads from her 2009 interview with Harvard’s famed English and aesthetics professor Elaine Scarry, contemplating the role of beauty as a moral agent and a tool of justice:

We also know the limits of the law… That in the end the law represents a part of the people’s will but that the people’s will is moved by beauty.


[Scarry] is talking about beauty and she says, “Beauty was for a long time [was] not only eliminated from universities, but even from museums… Lots of different museum directors have told me that for a while it was as if you weren’t supposed to be talking about beauty, which is hard to imagine if you’re teaching literature or if you’re a museum curator, but I mean one thing is just the way in which beauty … does lead people I think to be concerned with justice. Beauty brings about what Iris Murdoch called “a nonselfing.” She said that when you suddenly see something beautiful — her example was suddenly seeing a bird lift off — it brings about a nonselfing. You can see beauty pressing us towards justice. There are certain attributes that beautiful things have. Some people would say symmetry. Any definition of justice always involves at its heart some idea of balance or symmetry. Even if you look back over lots of philosophers who are talking about forms of justice, they always have this idea, say, equal pay for equal work, that’s a symmetry.”

Okay, that’s my favorite part. But this is an important part. “But sometimes people will say to me, well, first of all that they believe that it’s right, that the whole unselfing part is right, but they don’t believe in symmetry, and I really do believe in it because — and I think part of the reason why in this country we don’t like to talk anymore about symmetry in art or in justice is because we’re so asymmetrical, with so much money and so many weapons and, you know … if we had to start saying the heart of beauty is symmetry everybody would have to say, ‘gee, you know, we’ve got a big problem.’”

And she calls beauty a life pact. But that whole idea of the nonselfing — you see, when you talk about that you’re there but you’re not quite there, I think that’s a really creative moment because it is that moment when you, like a bird, take that lift-off. You’re not here and you’re not there. You’re in the rise… It seems to me a kind of a lift.
Lewis, who notes that beauty “slips in the back door of our rational thought and gets us to see the world differently,” examines the subject in greater depth in one particularly fascinating chapter of her book — a penetrating look at the legacy of Frederick Douglass, who paved the way for contemporary visual culture and pioneered the power of “aesthetic force.” Lewis writes:
The words to describe aesthetic force suggest that it leaves us changed — stunned, dazzled, knocked out. It can quicken the pulse, make us gape, even gasp with astonishment. Its importance is its animating trait — not what it is, but what it does to those who behold it in all its forms. Its seeming lightness can make us forget that it has weight, force enough to bring about a self-correction, the acknowledgment of failure at the heart of justice — the moment when we reconcile our past with our intended future selves. Few experiences get us to this place more powerfully, with a tender push past the praetorian-guarded doors of reason and logic, than the emotive power of aesthetic force.
The Rise, which I’ve previously admired in greater detail, is a superb read in its entirety. Treat yourself to Lewis and Smith’s full conversation below — a wide-ranging and enormously stimulating dialogue exploring the role of failure in the conquest of greatness, the crucial difference between success and mastery, and what it takes to stay encouraged through rejection and roadblock in creative work — then please consider supporting The New York Public Library in making such ennobling cultural discourse possible and freely available to the public.

Instinct is your highest form of intelligence.” ~ Sarah Lewis
Find more of Smith’s galvanizing genius in her enduring wisdom on how to listen between the lines in a culture of speaking, what self-esteem really means, how to stop letting others define us.

August 18, 2016

India became the country recording the 2nd highest bird count at 735 species after Equador with 784 species

Images by Meghna Joshi and Jitendra Ramchandani

In a recent global bird count conducted by the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC), India became the country recording the second highest bird count at 735 species, after Ecuador with 784 species! That's a good news! Firstly because bird population is thriving in worlds second populous country. Secondly, awareness among people is increasing and lastly, the awareness will bring people together to safeguard the habitat of birds.
The most frequently encountered species in India are house sparrow, bulbul, common crow, common myna, rock pigeon, black drongo, and asian koel, as per the GBBC. Though this depends upon the geography, where are you at the moment, largely you will always find these birds everywhere.
I am preparing a list of birds I have photographed, I hope to compile it soon with all other details! If I guess, the list will go uptp 90 species!